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    "As Heard on ESPN LA"

    Endorsed by Cedric the Entertainer
    CA License #766254

    We Repair and Replace P-Traps in the Los Angeles Area

    A trap is installed in every type of plumbing fixture either internally or externally. Traps hold water and are used to keep the sewer gas smells from entering the building. The most common of these is the sink P-trap. The P-trap is installed under each kitchen and lavatory sink of your home.
    A sink P-trap is not only the most common trap, it is also the easiest to install or replace. Installing a new P-trap is an easy way to replace your drain if it is leaking, clogged or just old and unsightly.
    P-Traps
    Most of the time, the P-traps under the sink can be either the white PVC or the black ABS. Both of these types of pipe are easy to work with. If the pipes are going to be exposed, then you can install a chrome P-trap so it will look nicer.
    Make this simple job even easier by first gathering up the tools and parts you will need:
    • Medium pipe wrench for metal P-trap
    • Channel-lock pliers for a metal P-trap or for stubborn connections
    • A new PVC P-trap (comes in a complete kit at large hardware stores)
    • Bucket or bowl to catch water – make sure it fits under the P-trap before you start
    • Old towel for mopping up water
    • Small rag or a square piece of plastic and a rubber band
    Before you go after your replacement P-trap or a PVC kit, make sure you measure your pipes to ensure you get the correct size! Whether working with metal or PVC P-traps, you will make this job a lot easier and less messy by using PVC as your new P-trap.
    Completely clear the area under the sink where you will be working.
    1. Unscrew the nut on each end of the P-trap, leaving one of the nuts loosely attached so that the entire U-shaped piece does not fall off. If your P-trap is metal, this is where you will use the pipe wrench or channel-lock pliers. If your P-trap is PVC, the nuts are made to be screwed and unscrewed by hand.
    2. Move your bucket or bowl into place, carefully remove the nut you left loosely screwed, and then remove the P-trap. Empty the water and debris into the bucket or bowl. At this time, you may want to stuff the pipe with that small rag or put your piece of plastic over it and secure it with the rubber band to prevent unpleasant gasses from escaping.
    3. If you’ve purchased the PVC P-trap kit, wipe the threaded ends lightly with rubbing alcohol to remove any possible debris.
    4. Fit the new P-trap into place and screw the nuts hand-tight, but don’t overtighten, as this can damage the compression seals.
    5. Turn your faucet on and let the water run to test for leaks. If one or both ends of the P-trap show signs of leakage, turn off the faucet and tighten the nut(s) just a bit more where the leak is. Dry off the pipes and test again for leakage; you shouldn’t have any, but if you do, you probably should remove the new P-trap and make certain all fittings are clean and fit correctly. Once you’ve ensured all fittings are clean and all fit correctly, begin again at step 3.